Animal Informatics

Subareas

Maker applications for animals

From pets to zoo animals we can now provide unique enrichment opportunities for animals, (such as the dog or rhino "Foobler"), and more appropriate interfaces for service animals, such as nose-friendly light switches, as well as assistive technology for animals themselves, including 3-D replacement limbs.

Automated quality of life

Innovative, often sensor-based data capture and analysis can be used to monitor captive animal health and wellness. Whether for livestock, zoos, or more temporary home.

Wildlife (and poacher) tracking and monitoring

Whether it's tracking & monitoring the movements of deer in Bloomington; diseased or endangered species in Indiana; or the migration patterns of animals throughout the world living on land, in the ocean, or in the air, these technologies include light-as-a-feather sensor design and data capture, the deployment and analysis of video data from drones, and still-image capture and analysis from social media.

Animal cognition

By studying how animals learn and think, we can discover which cognitive abilities are shared across the animal kingdom and which abilities are uniquely human. Moreover, by leveraging insights from animal cognition, we aim to build artificial brains with the same power and flexibility as biological brains.

Interspecies relationships and education

Whether it's through stunning exhibit design; novel approaches to data collection, analysis, and visualization; simulations and immersive experiences; or even the translation of other species' multisensory forms of communication. Technological innovation can help us understand animals and improve our interactions with them in remarkable ways.

Faculty research in Animal Computer Interaction

Professor of Informatics Christena Nippert-Eng highlights her research, including the fundamental principles of camouflage across species, the face-to-face, and digital realms to understand how camouflage works, and the innovations in ethnographic research she has developed through her work observing and designing habitats for gorillas at Lincoln Park Zoo.

Description of the video:

Professor of Informatics Christena Nippert-Eng highlights her research, including the fundamental principles of camouflage across species, the face-to-face, and digital realms to understand how camouflage works, and the innovations in ethnographic research she has developed through her work observing and designing habitats for gorillas at Lincoln Park Zoo.
Assistant Professor of Informatics Patrick Shih outlines his work using technology to amplify the capabilities of human-animal interaction, including the improvement of animal-human bonds, using computer vision to better understand animal cognition, captive animal enrichment, and more.

Description of the video:

Assistant Professor of Informatics Patrick Shih outlines his work using technology to amplify the capabilities of human-animal interaction, including the improvement of animal-human bonds, using computer vision to better understand animal cognition, captive animal enrichment, and more.
Associate Professor of Informatics Justin Woods showcases his research on using computational neuroscience and artificial intelligence to reverse engineer how animals develop the ability to perceive and understand the world, which could allow the development of AI that learns using the same methods as newborns.

Description of the video:

Associate Professor of Informatics Justin Woods showcases his research on using computational neuroscience and artificial intelligence to reverse engineer how animals develop the ability to perceive and understand the world, which could allow the development of AI that learns using the same methods as newborns.